New Zealand fears over Filipino nurse training

NZ Herald: NZ fears over Filipino nurse training
By Lincoln Tan
Posted: 4:00AM (NZST) Monday Feb 09, 2009

The Nursing Council is concerned that the rapid increase in nursing programmes in the Philippines could be at the expense of the quality of nursing, and says it will raise the issue with Filipino authorities.

Chief executive Carolyn Reed says representatives of the council will travel to the Philippines to meet the nursing regulatory authority and educational providers because it needs to be satisfied that educational courses preparing nurses coming to New Zealand are meeting acceptable standards.

“We do have concerns about the effect that such rapid growth has on programme quality,” Ms Reed said.

“There has been an escalation of programmes offering nursing education in the Philippines.

“Some figures suggest that in 2004 there were 30,000 nurses in education programmes and this has risen to 450,000 last year.”

Many in the Philippines take a nursing degree as a second tertiary qualification because they think that with the global shortage of nurses, it could be their ticket to migration.

Read entire story here.

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Pinoy nurses in NZ says new rule is unfair

NZ Herald: Overseas nurse says new rule is unfair
By Lincoln Tan

Trained Filipino nurses are crying foul over the Nursing Council’s tightening of rules governing registering overseas-trained nurses.

They say the new requirements are prejudicial and unfair and are keeping them at unskilled jobs on the minimum wage when hospitals are facing an acute shortage of nurses.

In new requirements effective from Thursday, all overseas-qualified nurses – including those from Britain and other English-speaking countries – will face a tough English language assessment.

It will require they score 7.0 in each band of the IELTS (International English language testing system) test, higher than the current university entry requirement of 6.0.

But the biggest stumbling block for many Filipino nurses is a recent ruling by the council that nursing degree courses of less than four years will no longer be deemed eligible.

For most of the Philippines-trained nurses, nursing was their second course, and the length of time they took to complete it was reduced because they had exemption for certain subjects taken for a previous degree. View Complete Article Here.