Discrimination against Asians in New Zealand grows

3News: Discrimination against Asians in New Zealand grows
Sat, 21 Feb 2009 6:01p.m.

Video Report

It was lunchtime in Newmarket and Johnny Zhang – who came to New Zealand from China five years ago – was getting groceries.

Just hours before heading to the markets he was abused for no reason as he waited at traffic lights.

“I didn’t even see who they were. Just suddenly they shouted at me and I even didn’t hear what they say, but it was quite loud and then they drove away,” explains Mr Zhang. “I just don’t get it.”

Phil Pam has also experienced discrimination. In his case, rubbish was thrown at him as he walked down the street.

“When you have those bad experiences, with bad people, you absolutely feel sad,” says fellow Chinese immigrant Mr Pam.

The latest race relations research confirms it is a sad trend according to 74 percent of respondents in a survey.

Asians were discriminated against. Sixty-eight percent said overweight people suffered discrimination while Pacific peoples and gays and lesbians were not far behind.

“What are the reasons? It’s difficult to say I think it’s a mixture of newness, ignorance and there is prejudice – there’s no doubt about that,” says Race Relations Commissioner Joris De Bres.

There is a surprise where people believe they encounter most discrimination: government departments top the list – ahead of public places, shops and employers. Read more.

Asian people are the most discriminated in New Zealand

Survey examines where we’re at on racial discrimination
East And Bays Courier (Friday, 27 February 2009)

Asian people are the most discriminated ethnic group in New Zealand, according to a national survey.

A UMR Research public opinion survey for the Human Rights Commission found 74 percent of respondents said Asians experience ‘a great deal’ or ‘some’ discrimination.

Men and children were the groups with the lowest level of perceived discrimination at 27 percent.

The figures are in the discrimination chapter of the Race Relations Report that race relations commissioner Joris de Bres released on February 20.

The full Race Relations Report will be published early next month.

It also records media reports of racially motivated crime in 2008, including a man sentenced to 21 years imprisonment for the racially motivated killing of Korean backpacker Jae Hyeon Kim.

Other stories include:

A Filipino schoolgirl who was called a “bloody Asian” and had stones thrown at her by three teenage boys in Christchurch

• Two men who were arrested and charged with intimidation after racially abusing a group of Asian people at a New Plymouth playground

• A man who was sentenced to six months home detention and ordered to pay $350 reparation for racial abuse and assault on an Asian teenager in Napier

• A Nelson man who was sentenced to nine months in prison for abusing and threatening an Asian man at a service station and striking another Asian man with his car outside a supermarket.

Racial discrimination and harassment complaints to the Human Rights Commission were down last year, from 414 in 2007 to 407. Full story.

New Zealand Move on Filipino nurses threatens political fallout

NZ Herald: Move on Filipino nurses threatens political fallout
4:00AM Tuesday Feb 24, 2009
By Lincoln Tan

Failure to register Philippine-trained nurses is not only turning many into overstayers, it puts New Zealand at risk of political backlash, Philippine Ambassador Bienvenido Tejano warns.

Mr Tejano says about 50 “distressed” overstaying Filipinos, many of them nurses, have approached him directly in the last year after they ran out of money, and he believes many others are in the same plight.

“It is a problem, and it is growing by the day. They come in groups of five, 10 and 15, and as much as we want to help them, there is not much we can do,” Mr Tejano said.

Many nurses from the Philippines had sold everything to come here – because it was widely publicised that there was an acute shortage of nurses in New Zealand – only to discover their qualifications were not recognised and they could not get registered, he said.

“They have no money to go back, and nothing to go back for any more.”

The New Zealand Nursing Council has questioned the quality of nursing qualifications and training programmes in the Philippines after nursing student numbers there boomed from 30,000 in 2004 to 450,000 last year – but Mr Tejano said it was “unacceptable” for the council to be judging the quality just by looking at the numbers.

Full Article.

Asians suffer discrimination in New Zealand

TVNZ: Asians suffer discrimination

Asians are regarded as the group most likely to suffer discrimination in New Zealand, according to survey results.

In the poll conducted for the Human Rights Commission by UMR Survey, 74% of respondents said Asian people experienced “a great deal” or “some” discrimination.

Men and children were groups with the lowest level of perceived discrimination at 27%.

The figures are contained in the Race Relations Report’s discrimination chapter, which will be released to the national meeting of the Federation of Ethnic Councils in Auckland on Saturday.

The report, the full version of which will be published next month, also records media reports of racially motivated crime last year.

Among them was the jailing of Hayden Brent McKenzie, 31, for a life term for the killing of Korean backpacker Jae Hyeon Kim near Westport in 2003. Full Article.

New Zealand fears over Filipino nurse training

NZ Herald: NZ fears over Filipino nurse training
By Lincoln Tan
Posted: 4:00AM (NZST) Monday Feb 09, 2009

The Nursing Council is concerned that the rapid increase in nursing programmes in the Philippines could be at the expense of the quality of nursing, and says it will raise the issue with Filipino authorities.

Chief executive Carolyn Reed says representatives of the council will travel to the Philippines to meet the nursing regulatory authority and educational providers because it needs to be satisfied that educational courses preparing nurses coming to New Zealand are meeting acceptable standards.

“We do have concerns about the effect that such rapid growth has on programme quality,” Ms Reed said.

“There has been an escalation of programmes offering nursing education in the Philippines.

“Some figures suggest that in 2004 there were 30,000 nurses in education programmes and this has risen to 450,000 last year.”

Many in the Philippines take a nursing degree as a second tertiary qualification because they think that with the global shortage of nurses, it could be their ticket to migration.

Read entire story here.

prescriptions? find out your options on MIMS

MIMS Philippines is an internet database of virtually every medicine sold in the Philippines.  The website is simple and easy to use, similar Google.

When you search for a medicine’s generic name it will give you all available brands of the drug.  The database will also give you the description, recommended dosage, contraindications, adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, mechanism of actions as well as the available variants and suggested retail prices.

Foreign nurses want NZ minister to axe language test

NZ Herald: Nurses want minister to axe language test
By Lincoln Tan

Frustrated overseas-trained nurses want the Minister of Health to review the new nursing registration rules, which include an English language test.

The New Zealand Nurses Organisation has also questioned the tougher rules, saying they will lead to an outflow of nurses, putting public health and safety at risk. Read Complete Article Here.

400 foreign students kicked out of NZ over four years
By NZPA

More than 400 foreign students have sent packing in the past four years for crimes or indiscretions, costing the taxpayer around $750,000.

Nearly 300 of the students required police escorts back to their home countries after being assessed as security or safety risks, according to figures released to The Dominion Post under the Official Information Act. Read Complete Article Here.