New Zealand Move on Filipino nurses threatens political fallout

NZ Herald: Move on Filipino nurses threatens political fallout
4:00AM Tuesday Feb 24, 2009
By Lincoln Tan

Failure to register Philippine-trained nurses is not only turning many into overstayers, it puts New Zealand at risk of political backlash, Philippine Ambassador Bienvenido Tejano warns.

Mr Tejano says about 50 “distressed” overstaying Filipinos, many of them nurses, have approached him directly in the last year after they ran out of money, and he believes many others are in the same plight.

“It is a problem, and it is growing by the day. They come in groups of five, 10 and 15, and as much as we want to help them, there is not much we can do,” Mr Tejano said.

Many nurses from the Philippines had sold everything to come here – because it was widely publicised that there was an acute shortage of nurses in New Zealand – only to discover their qualifications were not recognised and they could not get registered, he said.

“They have no money to go back, and nothing to go back for any more.”

The New Zealand Nursing Council has questioned the quality of nursing qualifications and training programmes in the Philippines after nursing student numbers there boomed from 30,000 in 2004 to 450,000 last year – but Mr Tejano said it was “unacceptable” for the council to be judging the quality just by looking at the numbers.

Full Article.

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New Zealand fears over Filipino nurse training

NZ Herald: NZ fears over Filipino nurse training
By Lincoln Tan
Posted: 4:00AM (NZST) Monday Feb 09, 2009

The Nursing Council is concerned that the rapid increase in nursing programmes in the Philippines could be at the expense of the quality of nursing, and says it will raise the issue with Filipino authorities.

Chief executive Carolyn Reed says representatives of the council will travel to the Philippines to meet the nursing regulatory authority and educational providers because it needs to be satisfied that educational courses preparing nurses coming to New Zealand are meeting acceptable standards.

“We do have concerns about the effect that such rapid growth has on programme quality,” Ms Reed said.

“There has been an escalation of programmes offering nursing education in the Philippines.

“Some figures suggest that in 2004 there were 30,000 nurses in education programmes and this has risen to 450,000 last year.”

Many in the Philippines take a nursing degree as a second tertiary qualification because they think that with the global shortage of nurses, it could be their ticket to migration.

Read entire story here.

Foreign nurses want NZ minister to axe language test

NZ Herald: Nurses want minister to axe language test
By Lincoln Tan

Frustrated overseas-trained nurses want the Minister of Health to review the new nursing registration rules, which include an English language test.

The New Zealand Nurses Organisation has also questioned the tougher rules, saying they will lead to an outflow of nurses, putting public health and safety at risk. Read Complete Article Here.

400 foreign students kicked out of NZ over four years
By NZPA

More than 400 foreign students have sent packing in the past four years for crimes or indiscretions, costing the taxpayer around $750,000.

Nearly 300 of the students required police escorts back to their home countries after being assessed as security or safety risks, according to figures released to The Dominion Post under the Official Information Act. Read Complete Article Here.

Pinoy nurses in NZ says new rule is unfair

NZ Herald: Overseas nurse says new rule is unfair
By Lincoln Tan

Trained Filipino nurses are crying foul over the Nursing Council’s tightening of rules governing registering overseas-trained nurses.

They say the new requirements are prejudicial and unfair and are keeping them at unskilled jobs on the minimum wage when hospitals are facing an acute shortage of nurses.

In new requirements effective from Thursday, all overseas-qualified nurses – including those from Britain and other English-speaking countries – will face a tough English language assessment.

It will require they score 7.0 in each band of the IELTS (International English language testing system) test, higher than the current university entry requirement of 6.0.

But the biggest stumbling block for many Filipino nurses is a recent ruling by the council that nursing degree courses of less than four years will no longer be deemed eligible.

For most of the Philippines-trained nurses, nursing was their second course, and the length of time they took to complete it was reduced because they had exemption for certain subjects taken for a previous degree. View Complete Article Here.

Latest New Zealand Immigration Headlines

A Romney ewe with her two lambs.Image from Wikipedia

NZ Herald: Professional migrants face discrimination in NZ – study

Excerpt: Highly skilled immigrants struggle to find jobs in New Zealand because they come up against a wall of discrimination from both potential employers and recruitment consultants, a Massey University study has found.

The Wellington-based study by human resource management lecturer Jacqui Campbell and communication lecturer Mingsheng Li unearthed disturbing evidence that many new arrivals remained unemployed or accepted unskilled work because of racism. Read more here.

NZ Herald: [New Zealand’s] Open-door policy on migrants ‘a danger’

New Zealand First has suggested the door should be shut on Asian immigrants.

Deputy leader Peter Brown said yesterday that there was a danger Asian “mini-societies” were being built in New Zealand. Read more here.

NZ Herald: Flow of [New Zealand] migrants to Australia still big

Excerpt: The annual flow of New Zealand residents to live in Australia is the biggest since the middle of 2001.

Statistics New Zealand (SNZ) said a net 29,600 people migrated to Australia in the year to February, up from 22,200 in the February 2007 year. Read more here.

NZ Herald: MP’s Indian neighbours hit back at ‘racist’ claims

Excerpt: Fourteen-year-old Karamjit Singh lives in the same Tauranga street as New Zealand First MP Peter Brown.

But that’s about all he has in common with his neighbour.

The Otumoetai College student said he felt “put down” by Mr Brown’s comments this week about curbing Asian immigration. Read more here.

Filipino nurses in NZ living in `slave labour’ conditions

New Zealand Herald: Filipino nurses living in `slave labour’ conditions
By Simon Collins

(Excerpt) Filipino nurses are being forced to work in what health officials describe as “slave labour” conditions in New Zealand rest homes to pay off often-exorbitant fees to recruitment agents and loan sharks.

A Weekend Herald investigation has found that some nurses are paying several times the true costs for work permits, bridging courses and registration in New Zealand, and are then bonded to work for up to three years at low wages in rest homes. (Full Story)


New Zealand Herald: [New Zealand] Immigration staff’s ignorance appalls migrants

By Lincoln Tan

(Excerpt) As more New Zealand residents quit the country, wannabe Kiwis say the key obstacle to calling Aotearoa home is the Immigration Service.

Long delays, missing documents and a lack of general knowledge among immigration officers were just some of the things residency applicants who spoke to the Herald complained of. (Full Story)

More immigrants to NZ, but flight to Aussie continues apace

More immigrants, but flight to Aussie continues apace – 20 Nov 2007 – Immigration news – NZ Herald