Discrimination against Asians in New Zealand grows

3News: Discrimination against Asians in New Zealand grows
Sat, 21 Feb 2009 6:01p.m.

Video Report

It was lunchtime in Newmarket and Johnny Zhang – who came to New Zealand from China five years ago – was getting groceries.

Just hours before heading to the markets he was abused for no reason as he waited at traffic lights.

“I didn’t even see who they were. Just suddenly they shouted at me and I even didn’t hear what they say, but it was quite loud and then they drove away,” explains Mr Zhang. “I just don’t get it.”

Phil Pam has also experienced discrimination. In his case, rubbish was thrown at him as he walked down the street.

“When you have those bad experiences, with bad people, you absolutely feel sad,” says fellow Chinese immigrant Mr Pam.

The latest race relations research confirms it is a sad trend according to 74 percent of respondents in a survey.

Asians were discriminated against. Sixty-eight percent said overweight people suffered discrimination while Pacific peoples and gays and lesbians were not far behind.

“What are the reasons? It’s difficult to say I think it’s a mixture of newness, ignorance and there is prejudice – there’s no doubt about that,” says Race Relations Commissioner Joris De Bres.

There is a surprise where people believe they encounter most discrimination: government departments top the list – ahead of public places, shops and employers. Read more.

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Asian people are the most discriminated in New Zealand

Survey examines where we’re at on racial discrimination
East And Bays Courier (Friday, 27 February 2009)

Asian people are the most discriminated ethnic group in New Zealand, according to a national survey.

A UMR Research public opinion survey for the Human Rights Commission found 74 percent of respondents said Asians experience ‘a great deal’ or ‘some’ discrimination.

Men and children were the groups with the lowest level of perceived discrimination at 27 percent.

The figures are in the discrimination chapter of the Race Relations Report that race relations commissioner Joris de Bres released on February 20.

The full Race Relations Report will be published early next month.

It also records media reports of racially motivated crime in 2008, including a man sentenced to 21 years imprisonment for the racially motivated killing of Korean backpacker Jae Hyeon Kim.

Other stories include:

A Filipino schoolgirl who was called a “bloody Asian” and had stones thrown at her by three teenage boys in Christchurch

• Two men who were arrested and charged with intimidation after racially abusing a group of Asian people at a New Plymouth playground

• A man who was sentenced to six months home detention and ordered to pay $350 reparation for racial abuse and assault on an Asian teenager in Napier

• A Nelson man who was sentenced to nine months in prison for abusing and threatening an Asian man at a service station and striking another Asian man with his car outside a supermarket.

Racial discrimination and harassment complaints to the Human Rights Commission were down last year, from 414 in 2007 to 407. Full story.